Passage times/ Sabre speed

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Passage times/ Sabre speed

Post by Sabre27Admin » Wed May 10, 2017 8:13 pm

stevejavelin
United Kingdom
4 Posts

Posted - 17/02/2016 : 18:21:24
I've been happily sailing a triple keel Trident 24 for the past few years but the time has come to get something a little bigger.

The bilge keel Sabre seems an obvious choice (drying mooring). I like how they look and appreciate the extra space but I have never sailed one.

My only reservation stems from comments implying that Sabres are rather slow. According to some PY handicap figures the Sabre is slower than the Trident whereas the Clyde Yacht Clubs system has them the other way round.

I really would like something faster than my Trident if possible- I cover reasonable distances quite often- and mostly single-handed.

Any opinions based on experience would be appreciated. I'd also be really interested in a realistic average speed you use for passage planning.

I hope I haven't offended any proud Sabre Rattlers with this post, that's not what I intended.

Thanks
SteveV
United Kingdom
43 Posts

Posted - 17/02/2016 : 18:24:53
How fast does a trident 24 go?

stevejavelin
United Kingdom
4 Posts

Posted - 17/02/2016 : 19:44:34
Hi

Trident (mine anyway)can make about 6 knots in ideal conditions off the wind.

The triple keelers are not brilliant to windward and in my hands the tacking angle is pretty poor. I do a lot of my sailing on the East coast so any passage of over 6 hours will include some adverse tide.

I think a fair (and honest) average for passage planning would be 3.5 to 4 knots. Always a pleasure when this is exceeded.

How about your Sabre?

SteveV
United Kingdom
43 Posts

Posted - 17/02/2016 : 21:01:39
5-6kts mostly, fin keel

ianfr
United Kingdom
104 Posts

Posted - 18/02/2016 : 08:44:42
Fin Keel, between 5 - 6 knots on average they are heavy boats so needs a few knots of wind however

Compared with modern light fantastics they are perhaps a bit slower, but not by much!

Kind Regards

Jo and Ian
Apogee, Tollesbury
Edited by - ianfr on 18/02/2016 08:46:49

Sandokan
Germany
7 Posts

Posted - 19/02/2016 : 18:11:53
Hi,

Sandokan is a bilge keeler, the highest speed we saw on our log (a NASA duet) was 6 knots, we had wind abeam and I guess wind speed was about 4-5 beaufort. The log should show the correct speed as it shows the same speed as the gps (we proofed this in an harbor without tide or current). We calculate with 4 to 4,5 knots as average for passage planning. The tacking angle is much more than 90°, I guess it is maybe somewhat of 110° or maybe even more. We bought Sandokan three years ago, the sails are ok, but maybe with more sailing experience and new sails speed an tacking angle would be better.

Regards Klaus

SteveV
United Kingdom
43 Posts

Posted - 19/02/2016 : 18:29:47
bilgers must be a bit slower then, i regularly see 7 kts on the calibrated log if It gets too windy and needs a reef

stevejavelin
United Kingdom
4 Posts

Posted - 22/02/2016 : 10:34:31
Thanks for these answers. Pretty much what I expected I guess. It seems you just have to sacrifice some speed if you need a bilge keeler. If it wasn't for that everyone would have one maybe?

ken endean
United Kingdom
52 Posts

Posted - 01/03/2016 : 16:38:37
A single keel has less wetted area than twins, so is always likely to create less resistance. However, absolute speed in strong wind depends on waterline length (which may lengthen when hard-pressed), wind strength, sail balance and nerve rather than keel type. On 'London Apprentice' (twin keels) we have occasionally had the speedo needle nudging the stop at 10 knots, albeit only when surfing on waves. Flat water, Force 5+ wind off the land and main reefed for balance will often give 7.5 - 8 knots in the surges. Our fastest one-hour run, across the Baie de St Brieuc, averaged 6.5 knots against the (reliable) log and I never expect to improve on that.

Quite apart from the speed figures, the best thing about the Sabre in strong winds is that she is always docile and obedient, with no nasty habits. When things get a bit too thrilling, such docility is very welcome!

stevejavelin
United Kingdom
4 Posts

Posted - 04/03/2016 : 16:48:39
Thanks Ken. I'm a bit of a fan of your books and articles and it is heartening and reassuring that you have stuck with your Sabre over the years.
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